Pruning

Tree Pruning

WHY PRUNE?

Pruning promotes growth thereby maintaining the health and vigour of the tree.

Makes the tree safe in it’s environment.

Regulates the size and shape to improve quality and aesthetic appearance.

It is important that clients are aware of the basic terms commonly used to describe tree works so that they fully understand what our arboriculturists are recommending. The three main pruning terms are Crown Thinning, Crown Lifting and Crown Reduction.  These are explained in our ‘Tree Services’ section at length.  Other forms of pruning include:

FORMATIVE PRUNING

Works undertaken to newly planted or early establishment trees to encourage the formation of a good branch structure and canopy appropriate to the species.  This is achieved by the removal of potential defects such as co-dominant leaders and crossing branches, leaving only small, quickly occluding wounds.

Advanced Tree Services aim of formative pruning is to produce a tree which in maturity will be free from any major physical weaknesses.  This technique can also be applied to other management strategies for promoting healthy specimens i.e. pollarding and utility clearance.

VETERAN PRUNING

Natural fracture techniques involve pruning methods that are used to mimic the way that tears and fractured ends naturally occur on trunks and branches.  A coronet cut [shown here in a sponsored veteran tree management/training day] is a type of natural fracture technique that is particularly intended to mimic jagged edges characteristically seen on broken branches following storm damage or static limb failure.

VETERAN TREE MANAGEMENT

In 2008 ATS entered into a contract with the Royal Parks for tree maintenance within Bushy Park [and standby contractor for Richmond Park].  The specific nature of the site has required the company to diversify it’s knowledge base to incorporate the emerging techniques in veteran tree management.

Staff have attended training courses regarding Bats and Arboriculture and have developed an understanding and working appreciation of deadwood habitat.  The creation of monoliths through the use of natural fracture pruning has been welcomed by operatives as a fresh approach to Arboriculture.  This work often involves the use of an endoscope for checking of bats and working in close partnership with ecologists in order to safeguard important species and habitats.